‘Project Almanac’ (2015) review: A most dangerous butterfly effect

‘Project Almanac’ has its flaws, but still entertaining

The complex theories surrounding the confounding concept of time travel are enough to drive anyone crazy. Combine that with the nearly infinite ways your choices, once in the past, can ripple out and affect reality, and you have yourself a recipe for a headache.

But “Project Almanac,” the latest entry in the found-footage genre, not only us with multiple trips through time and altering realities, it throws in enough teenage angst to remind anyone of their awkward teenage years — and not in a good way.

The premise in “Almanac” is interesting enough: A group of high school teenagers — most proficient in engineering, physics, mathematics and other high-level sciences; one good with a camera — stumble upon a old camcorder in the attic of David and Christina’s (Jonny Weston and Virginia Gardner, respectively). The camera belonged to their father, a brilliant scientist who died 10 years ago. What they found on the camera defied logic: teenage David at his seventh birthday party. Unable to otherwise explain why his current self would show up in a video from 10 years, the group settles that time travel was somehow involved. Digging deeper into the mystery, they find the schematics and powerful computer core that were to be used to create a time machine in the basement.

Click here to read the full review at TDN.com.

Three confusing stars out of five.

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From left, Sam Lerner as Quinn Goldberg, Jonny Weston as David Raskin, Allen Evangelista as Adam Le, and Virginia Gardner as Christina Raskin star in ‘Project Almanac,’ which contends with the ripple effects of time travel. (Photo credit: Paramount Pictures)

From left, Sam Lerner as Quinn Goldberg, Jonny Weston as David Raskin, Allen Evangelista as Adam Le, and Virginia Gardner as Christina Raskin star in ‘Project Almanac,’ which contends with the ripple effects of time travel. (Photo credit: Paramount Pictures)

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One response to “‘Project Almanac’ (2015) review: A most dangerous butterfly effect

  1. Pingback: ‘Power Rangers’ (2017) review: A color-coded fight for survival | Silver Screening Reviews·

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